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Dagstuhl-Seminar 18101

Scheduling

( 04. Mar – 09. Mar, 2018 )


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Bitte benutzen Sie folgende Kurz-Url zum Verlinken dieser Seite: https://www.dagstuhl.de/18101

Organisatoren

Kontakt



Programm

Motivation

Scheduling is the problem of deciding how to allocate scarce resources to best achieve some objective. Computer systems researchers started studying scheduling in the 1960s during the development of operating systems. In this context the resources would be components of the computer, such as CPUs, memory, and I/O devices. As the client-server model of computing (e.g. database servers, web servers, mail servers, name servers, etc.) became ubiquitous in the subsequent decades, algorithmic scheduling research was not significantly affected as the underlying natural theoretical problems were similar. However, it is now the case that in many information technologies, the network, and not the servers, has become the limiting factor in obtaining better performance.

The goal of this Dagstuhl Seminar is to bring together part of the community of algorithmic researchers who focus on scheduling, and part of the community of algorithmic researchers who focus on networking in general, and resource management within networks in particular. These communities are far from unknown to each other as they attend the same general academic conferences. But as each community has its own specialized conferences, there is less interaction between these communities than there should be. Further there are differences in the types of algorithmic problems these communities are naturally drawn towards. We expect that the outcome of this seminar will be more collaboration between the two communities. The main collaboration that we foresee will arise from the networking community describing various models and associated resource allocation problems and, together with the scheduling community, making progress on some of the algorithmic problems in these models. We also anticipate that the scheduling community may have problems that are amenable to techniques developed in the networking community.

Copyright Magnus M. Halldorsson, Nicole Megow, and Clifford Stein

Summary

This fifth meeting in a series of Dagstuhl "Scheduling" seminars brought together part of the community of algorithmic researchers who focus on scheduling, and part of the community of algorithmic researchers who focus on networking in general, and resource management within networks in particular. These communities are far from unknown to each other as they attend the same general academic conferences. But as each community has its own specialized conferences, there is less interaction between these communities than there should be. Further there are differences in the types of algorithmic problems these communities are naturally drawn towards.

The primary objective of the seminar was to expose each community to the important models, problems and techniques from the other community, and to facilitate dialog and collaboration between researchers. The program included 22 invited main talks including an inspiring talk on practical applications at ABB Corporate Research, 8 short spot-light talks, two open problem sessions in the beginning of the week, and ample unstructured time for research and interaction. The overall atmosphere among the 44 participants was very interactive.

A highlight of the seminar was a joint Wednesday-session with the Dagstuhl Seminar 18102 "Dynamic Traffic Models in Transportation Science". It was a fortunate coincidence that both seminars were scheduled in parallel. Indeed, questions related to networks, scheduling and resource sharing arise naturally in traffic control and transportation science. It was an inspiring secondary outcome of the workshop to realize this strong overlap in interests which led to interesting discussions between researchers of the different communities.

Copyright Magnús M. Halldórsson, Nicole Megow, and Clifford Stein

Teilnehmer
  • Susanne Albers (TU München, DE) [dblp]
  • Yossi Azar (Tel Aviv University, IL) [dblp]
  • Nikhil Bansal (TU Eindhoven, NL) [dblp]
  • Sanjoy Baruah (Washington University, US) [dblp]
  • Syamantak Das (IIIT - New Dehli, IN) [dblp]
  • Jelena Diakonikolas (Boston University, US) [dblp]
  • Michael Dinitz (Johns Hopkins University - Baltimore, US) [dblp]
  • Friedrich Eisenbrand (EPFL - Lausanne, CH) [dblp]
  • Thomas Erlebach (University of Leicester, GB) [dblp]
  • Klaus-Tycho Foerster (Universität Wien, AT) [dblp]
  • Seth Gilbert (National University of Singapore, SG) [dblp]
  • Anupam Gupta (Carnegie Mellon University - Pittsburgh, US) [dblp]
  • Magnús M. Halldórsson (Reykjavik University, IS) [dblp]
  • Sungjin Im (University of California - Merced, US) [dblp]
  • Thomas Kesselheim (TU Dortmund, DE) [dblp]
  • Samir Khuller (University of Maryland - College Park, US) [dblp]
  • Valerie King (University of Victoria, CA) [dblp]
  • Fabian Daniel Kuhn (Universität Freiburg, DE) [dblp]
  • Amit Kumar (Indian Inst. of Technology - New Dehli, IN) [dblp]
  • Alberto Marchetti-Spaccamela (Sapienza University of Rome, IT) [dblp]
  • Nicole Megow (Universität Bremen, DE) [dblp]
  • Danupon Nanongkai (KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE) [dblp]
  • Yvonne-Anne Pignolet (ABB Corporate Research - Baden-Dättwil, CH) [dblp]
  • Kirk Pruhs (University of Pittsburgh, US) [dblp]
  • Thomas Rothvoss (University of Washington - Seattle, US) [dblp]
  • Barna Saha (University of Massachusetts, US) [dblp]
  • Jared Saia (University of New Mexico, US) [dblp]
  • Gabriel Scalosub (Ben Gurion University - Beer Sheva, IL) [dblp]
  • Christian Scheideler (Universität Paderborn, DE) [dblp]
  • Kevin Schewior (University of Chile, CL) [dblp]
  • Jiri Sgall (Charles University - Prague, CZ) [dblp]
  • David Shmoys (Cornell University, US) [dblp]
  • René Sitters (VU University of Amsterdam, NL) [dblp]
  • Martin Skutella (TU Berlin, DE) [dblp]
  • Frits C. R. Spieksma (TU Eindhoven, NL) [dblp]
  • Clifford Stein (Columbia University, US) [dblp]
  • Leen Stougie (VU University of Amsterdam, NL) [dblp]
  • Jukka Suomela (Aalto University, FI) [dblp]
  • Ola Svensson (EPFL - Lausanne, CH) [dblp]
  • Marc Uetz (University of Twente, NL) [dblp]
  • Rob van Stee (Universität Siegen, DE) [dblp]
  • Anke van Zuylen (College of William and Mary - Williamsburg, US) [dblp]
  • Jose Verschae (Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, CL) [dblp]
  • Tjark Vredeveld (Maastricht University, NL) [dblp]

Verwandte Seminare
  • Dagstuhl-Seminar 08071: Scheduling (2008-02-10 - 2008-02-15) (Details)
  • Dagstuhl-Seminar 10071: Scheduling (2010-02-14 - 2010-02-19) (Details)
  • Dagstuhl-Seminar 13111: Scheduling (2013-03-10 - 2013-03-15) (Details)
  • Dagstuhl-Seminar 16081: Scheduling (2016-02-21 - 2016-02-26) (Details)
  • Dagstuhl-Seminar 20081: Scheduling (2020-02-16 - 2020-02-21) (Details)
  • Dagstuhl-Seminar 23061: Scheduling (2023-02-05 - 2023-02-10) (Details)

Klassifikation
  • data structures / algorithms / complexity
  • networks
  • optimization / scheduling

Schlagworte
  • Scheduling
  • Networks
  • Approximation Algorithms