https://www.dagstuhl.de/22131

27. März – 01. April 2022, Dagstuhl-Seminar 22131

Framing in Communication: From Theories to Computation

Organisatoren

Katarzyna Budzynska (Warsaw University of Technology, PL)
Chris Reed (University of Dundee, GB)
Manfred Stede (Universität Potsdam, DE)
Benno Stein (Bauhaus-Universität Weimar, DE)

Auskunft zu diesem Dagstuhl-Seminar erteilt

Dagstuhl Service Team

Dokumente

Dagstuhl Report, Volume 12, Issue 3 Dagstuhl Report
Motivationstext
Teilnehmerliste
Gemeinsame Dokumente
Programm des Dagstuhl-Seminars [pdf]

Summary

Language is used for many purposes, both private and public. When speech or text is directed to wide audiences, it often aims at influencing stances, opinions, and dispositions of readers. This can be done by relatively transparent, rational argumentation, but also in considerably more subtle ways, by phrasing utterances in such a way that the underlying intent is noticed by readers more in passing – or not consciously at all. This is the realm of “framing”, which concerns the careful selecting of the aspects of an event to be reported (those that fit the goal of letting a positive or negative evaluation shine through); the choice of terms that carry an inherent evaluation (e.g., “the frugal four” versus “the stingy four” in recent EU negotiations); and employing stylistic devices that correspondingly support the purpose (e.g., a monotonic versus a lively rhythm). Framing has been studied for quite some time, from many different perspectives, and it has also been covered by popular science books. Under these circumstances, it is not surprising that definitions and emphasis differ quite a bit between and even within disciplines – the notion of framing can itself be framed, too.

The computational research on language processing has addressed some of the linguistic purposes mentioned above: Sentiment analysis and opinion mining are well-established fields; argumentation mining has more recently caught much attention and is in the process of "settling down". Framing, being less transparent at the linguistic surface, has seen only very few attempts at formal modelling so far. The proposers of this seminar are convinced, however, that a computational treatment of framing is a central next step – extending opinion and argument analysis - and its operationalization calls for a deeper understanding of the term and the underlying mechanisms. Before computational theories can be formulated and applications be built, the potential contributions by the various relevant disciplines (sociology, political science, psychology, communication science, and others) should be studied carefully and assessed for potential common ground. This is the first purpose of the proposed seminar, and the second is the follow-up step of developing a roadmap for productive computational research toward the automatic identification of framing in text and speech, and modelling the connection to the underlying reasoning processes. To accomplish this, the seminar will address a relatively broad range of topics, covering relevant subfields of linguistics, computational modelling and application, as well as practical investigation of framing in the social sciences.

Framing, being less transparent at the linguistic surface, has seen only very few attempts on formal modelling so far. The proposers of this seminar are convinced, however, that a computational treatment of framing is a central next step – extending opinion and argument analysis – and its operationalisation calls for a deeper understanding of the term and the underlying mechanisms. Before computational theories can be formulated and applications be built, the potential contributions by the various relevant disciplines (sociology, political science, psychology, communication science, and others) should be studied carefully and assessed for potential common ground. This is the first area of the proposed seminar, and the second is the follow-up step of developing a roadmap for productive computational research toward the automatic identification of framing in text and speech, and modelling the connection to the underlying reasoning processes.

To accomplish this, the seminar addressed a range of topics, including:

  • Argumentation theory, discourse analysis, rhetoric
  • Journalism, political science, communication science
  • Sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics
  • Computational pragmatics and discourse modelling
  • Computational social science and social media
  • Computational models of argument and debating technologies
Summary text license
  Creative Commons BY 4.0
  Katarzyna Budzynska, Chris Reed, Manfred Stede, and Benno Stein

Classification

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Computation And Language
  • Computers And Society

Keywords

  • Communication Strategies
  • Discourse and Dialogue
  • Computational Argumentation
  • Natural Language Processing
  • Social Media Analytics

Dokumentation

In der Reihe Dagstuhl Reports werden alle Dagstuhl-Seminare und Dagstuhl-Perspektiven-Workshops dokumentiert. Die Organisatoren stellen zusammen mit dem Collector des Seminars einen Bericht zusammen, der die Beiträge der Autoren zusammenfasst und um eine Zusammenfassung ergänzt.

 

Download Übersichtsflyer (PDF).

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Publikationen

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